DarcSowers.Com

I'm an avid collector of books with a growing obsession for Lego minifigures. I draw a comic which I distribute for free online. I am also a trained researcher and librarian with her MLS from The University of Iowa.

Here you'll find work in progress, sketchbook practice, humorous items, personal thoughts, and resource links... as well as the occasional post sharing items from my art book collection. Just think of this as a backstage pass into my studio.

Sometimes I gripe and say not-nice things. If that makes you uncomfortable sugar-booger, then this isn't the place for you.
Recent Tweets @DarcSowers
You Make Me Smile
colleendoran:

No matter how good an artist you are, no matter how many awards, no matter how popular, someone is always going to think you’re a terrible creator or a bad person. There is no accomplishment, skill, or generous heart that can insulate you from a public scourging. This is the hard truth of being a pro. It’s harder on artists now more than ever because everyone has a voice online regardless of how mean, false, or dead stupid it is.Ten time Hugo Award winning artist Frank Kelly Freas was my mentor when I was a kid, and I worship the ground he walked on. Everyone who knew him loved him. He was kind and generous. He was also a pioneer of SF/Fantasy art, and a wonderful cartoonist. So imagine my surprise when I found this letter published in a 1970’s era magazine. It’s pretty vicious and cruel.If someone wonderful like Frank Kelly Freas had to deal with this, we all have to deal with this. Remember: a lot of what people say isn’t about you. It’s about them. Don’t carry their baggage for them.Get on with your life, get on with your art.

colleendoran:

No matter how good an artist you are, no matter how many awards, no matter how popular, someone is always going to think you’re a terrible creator or a bad person. There is no accomplishment, skill, or generous heart that can insulate you from a public scourging. This is the hard truth of being a pro. It’s harder on artists now more than ever because everyone has a voice online regardless of how mean, false, or dead stupid it is.

Ten time Hugo Award winning artist Frank Kelly Freas was my mentor when I was a kid, and I worship the ground he walked on. Everyone who knew him loved him. He was kind and generous. He was also a pioneer of SF/Fantasy art, and a wonderful cartoonist. So imagine my surprise when I found this letter published in a 1970’s era magazine. It’s pretty vicious and cruel.

If someone wonderful like Frank Kelly Freas had to deal with this, we all have to deal with this.

Remember: a lot of what people say isn’t about you. It’s about them. Don’t carry their baggage for them.

Get on with your life, get on with your art.

(via daemionfox)

What is today’s work…? Here’s a quick peek. There’s a lot more sketching to do still before I can move on to the inks.

Today is Batman Day! In honor of Batman’s 75th anniversary, I’m gonna put on some Batman: The Animated Series and draw comics! Because that’s what I do. Course, that does mean no comic book store Batman fun for the day… but maybe in the evening. If I get today’s work done.

Artwork by the awesome Dustin Nguyen.

How many questions a day are you getting?
darcsowers darcsowers Said:

It varies. Some days a few, others none. I have a list of “Mail Bag!” questions in the queue and answer them in no particular order. It comes down to whichever one strikes my fancy at the time. These are extra pages at are meant to be fun for me as well. Asking me to answer a question ahead of the others is a good way of ensuring it ends up being the last one I tackle.

In today’s comic

I tried something a little different with today’s extra “Mail Bag!” comic. It seems doing a quick bit of inking as well as some thin base coloring is faster than the scratchy shading I was doing previously. And we get it in color! Can’t beat that, eh?

If you’d like to ask a character a question, the ask box is open.


If you enjoy ‘Code Name: Hunter’ and have a few coins to spare please consider becoming a Patreon.

textsfromsuperheroes:

Celebrate Batman’s 75th Anniversary with the Best of Batman on Texts From Superheroes

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Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hi there! I am writing a novel and in it there is a character who learned self defense plus some martial arts skill online- watching youtube videos, and what not. First of all, I want to ask you how effective that would be? And If he comes into a fight with a person properly trained in a martial art, what would be his(online learning guy) weaknesses?
darcsowers darcsowers Said:

howtofightwrite:

It’s not going to be that effective. Let me break it down.

Self-Defense: Self-defense training isn’t about learning how to fight, it’s about learning some tools and techniques to avoid trouble and extract yourself from a bad situation. All the techniques learned are geared toward providing the trainee to create openings that allow them to get away, to see trouble happening before it starts. “Do what you have to and get away” is the mantra. The techniques should be simple, easy to use, and capable of fitting a variety of situations. This isn’t always the case. Joint locks and throws were very popular in the 90s (and probably still are), the question is of course whether or not the student will remember how to do them a month or two later after only a few days or weeks of training.

Now, there are different schools of self-defense training. They also have different lengths. The best self-defense is consistent training, especially one where the instructor has a practical combat outlook. (The term “practical combat” can be confusing if you’ve never encountered it, it means the martial training has a total focus on “actual combat” or “real world combat” as opposed to sport or exhibition. Training with the expectation of real word application and usually restricted to students 18 or over. Here, you’ll see full contact training without pads because the only way to truly know how to do a technique is to experience it. Military combat styles, Police Academy, etc practice practical combat.)

The late Close Combat and Self-Defense Legend Rex Applegate is a good resource if you want to study the difference, so is Michael Janich. These are usually instructors who have a police or military background first and foremost with secondary martial arts training.

"Practical" self-defense will often include guns, knives, and other weapons as legitimate options to use when defending yourself. Because of the way non-martial artists and recreational martial artists think about the word "practical", "militant" self-defense is probably a more accurate term to use.

Your character probably isn’t doing this kind of training, but it’s a good idea to stop and really hammer out where they were taught self-defense and what kind of class it was.

Did they pay for it? Go to any YMCA or public gym and you’ll find flyers for different martial arts schools and occasionally self-defense seminars. Many martial arts schools offer their own brand of self-defense as part of their school’s offerings. Any shop, like many privately owned bookstores, might keep around flyers and other sorts of community events (such as cons and author readings). Privately taught self-defense can be expensive, ringing in around $80 to $200 (or more) for just a few weeks. However, colleges and other groups do offer some seminars for free. If your character was in the Boy Scouts (or possibly Girl Scouts), they may have gotten their self-defense training as part of their activities. Sheriffs offices and Police Precincts regularly offer self-defense seminars for free to the public. (The techniques taught are usually the public safety approved variation of Police hand to hand.) I recommend at least looking into these for research if you’re serious about this character as they won’t cost you anything more than your time. (If you’re under 18, you’ll need a legal guardian to sign the waiver and participate with you.)

How long was their session? The guy who put down $200-$400 for a two week retreat into the mountains where he trained six hours a day, every day, is going to look a little different from the guy who spent a few hours learning some throws in the college gymnasium.

Did they earn any certifications? Some courses offer certifications similar to the belt ranking system, but also put in a legal prohibition of teaching the techniques to anyone else. Gun disarm seminars often include these.

Remember, knowing how to do a thing doesn’t mean you’re qualified to teach the thing. Just like me discussing the concept behind a technique doesn’t translate into practical application if you don’t already know how to do it. This segues us nicely into:

Martial Arts Instruction Through YouTube Videos:

No, it wouldn’t be effective. Just like many internet blogs, videos on YouTube are a form of self-promotion. The information handed out by martial arts instructors in those videos is useful for inspiring interest, drum up business for their studio, and help out trainees in their martial style who already have a school and instructor they train with.

Every so often, we get requests on this blog to sit down and teach what we know. My answer is always the same: you cannot learn martial arts by remote. You need the assistance of (at the very least) an instructor and of a training partner to actually learn how to properly do a technique. A video can show you a concept, it can show you step by step how something is supposed to be done, but it cannot correct your bad habits. Bad habits are inevitable. It can’t show you what the technique should feel like, it can’t push you to work harder, and it can’t help you beyond the concept. The concept may give your character confidence, just like reading through a variety of tags on this blog may have inspired you with confidence but what we are able to imagine doing and what we can do are separate things.

Example: Once, outside my apartment, I saw a little girl practicing cartwheels. Each time, she tried it but always stopped halfway and fell over. She tried again and again, but she couldn’t complete the cartwheel. Watching her, I could see what the problem was: at the beginning she wasn’t putting enough momentum in to carry her through the wheel. So, I told her “Hey, you need to throw yourself into it, use your arms more, like this,” and put my hands up over my head I showed her the motion. She looked at me strangely because I was a stranger, but then she tried it and immediately after completed the wheel. Afterwards, she did cartwheels all over the lawn.

When your character is doing the technique wrong, and they will because all beginners do, there will be no one there to help them. For a really good example of the difference, go sit down and watch The Karate Kid remake with Jackie Chan and Jaden Smith. In the movie, Jaden Smith’s character brings videos from his former Karate school with him to China and tries to rely on them for guidance when he’s bullied by kids who train at the famous Martial Arts school nearby. You can see where he’s going wrong when he’s practicing with the videos, but again, there’s no one around to fix it until he starts training with Jackie Chan. Really, watch it.

This is part of why I, personally, get frustrated when techniques are passed around the internet as self-defense without the context behind them. “Hey guys! Did you know you could choke someone out with your thighs!” Yes, I did actually that’s a triangle leg choke and, like all grappling moves, it’s really difficult to pull off without a lot of… “Pass this around! It could save a life!” Oh, for fuck’s sake.

Watching videos on YouTube and even practicing them in your own home is likely to inspire you with confidence that you know how to fight, but is actually much more likely to get you killed. However, as writers, it’s great for conceptual work and studying up on the different personality traits and quirks martial arts inspire in their practitioners. Seriously, I love watching YouTube videos by different experts in the same style. It’s very illuminating about how different kinds of training affect personalities. For me, it’s basically just glorified people watching. For your character, it’ll probably fill them with false confidence.

Strengths and Weaknesses:

Online Guy’s weaknesses versus Martial Arts Guy would be:

Slower: yeah, he may strike first, but he’s gonna be much slower both physically and mentally in terms of following what’s happening.

Lack the Ability to Chain: Martial artists train and train and train so that their techniques become second nature, so blocking or reacting to an attack becomes as instinctual as a non-martial artist trying to swat a fly. They can use their techniques together and switch them up. Basically: one, two, three. Online Guy will be lucky if he can pull off anything other than a one.

Less Adaptable: Depending on what Martial Arts Guy has been trained to do, he or she will probably be more adaptable than Online Guy, simply because they’ve spent more time doing different things. They’re more likely to go with what’s first and reactionary. Online Guy has only been trained to use his techniques in very specific situations, he’s going to have to think about each technique he uses. At the very least, he’s been trained to flee not to fight. (Traditional martial artists weaknesses are often that they’re trained to fight (sport), not to wound and flee.)

Sloppy Technique: Sloppiness, this translates to some holes in his defense and he’ll wear out much faster. Martial arts techniques teach conservation of movement, tighter technique expends less energy which allows you to fight longer. Online Guy will have less control, making him more likely to hurt his opponent even if he doesn’t want to. He will also be unbalanced, lack precision, and his body will telegraph his movements before he moves.

Isn’t Used to Kinetic Impact: Unless Online Guy spends a lot of time actually hitting other people, he won’t be used to the pain that comes from actually connecting someone else. Martial Arts Guy might not be ready for this either, but he has the help of practicing on pads.

Those are the big ones. The big thing to remember about Online Guy is that he thinks he knows what he’s doing, but actually doesn’t. He’s barely a novice, but those qualities are what make him dangerous.

-Michi

Tried something different with the “Mail Bag!” comic for tomorrow. It seems doing a quick bit of inking as well as some thin base coloring is faster than the scratchy shading I was doing previously.

Tried something different with the “Mail Bag!” comic for tomorrow. It seems doing a quick bit of inking as well as some thin base coloring is faster than the scratchy shading I was doing previously.

In today’s comic

Thank you for understanding about the botched plan for this week, guys! You all are awesome!


If you enjoy ‘Code Name: Hunter’ and have a few coins to spare please consider becoming a Patreon.